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Come and Take It

Come and Take It

Living in the South, we have all heard the phrase “Come and Take It.” And if you haven't, you've certainly heard the idea. There seems to be a certain demographic that embodies that phrase today, and often time that demographic has been accused by naysayers of not knowing the actual meaning behind it. I'm here today to set the record straight.

 

The phrase “Come and Take It” is most often stylized with the classic cannon and star above it as a symbol of freedom and most importantly the right to bear arms. If someone or a power that be wants to get a hold of the weaponry/tools/whatever-you-wanna-call-your-firearms, then they are going to have to come and get them themselves. At which point, an invasion of property would lead to a justifiable firing off of these objects of desire. You get the point. Come and take them if you really want them. See what happens.

 

In terms of not knowing the meaning, I would beg to differ. Most people are informed of the Battle of Gonzales that took place in Gonzales, Texas on October 2, 1835. Mexican authorities had given the settlers of Gonzales a small cannon 4 years prior in order to help protect themselves from frequent Comanche raids. During this battle of the Texas Revolution, the political unrest with Mexico came to be such that they were now requesting to have the cannon back. So the then Texians flew their flag with the sign we've all come to widely recognize offering their battle cry, “Come and Take It.” However, the settlers of Gonzales were not the first to use this phrase. This phrase can be dated back to almost prehistoric times. King Leonidas I of Sparta in the Battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC, during the second Persian invasion of Greece used the phrase “molon labe” (“come and take them” when the Persians called for a surrender of arms).

 

This sign of courage and fighting for the right to freedom has been emblazoned on all sorts of apparel in the hundreds of years to follow the Battle of Gonzales. We are no exception here at the Branding Iron. The freedom and the courage to fight for it is laid within the walls of our business. We enjoy our hard fought American freedom, and we also enjoy our freedom in small business to promote our own ideals including the ones this great country was founded upon.

 

Come check out our Come and Take It apparel or shop it in the online store – we will be happy to have you either way.

 

Come and Take It,

Jenna